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Reading

 

In Year 1 we heart reading!

 

Whether you like picture books, audio books, comics, or non-fiction books, reading is so much fun! Here are some activities you can do at home:

 

Book Talk

 

In school, we do book talk. We read part of a book or poem and discuss four questions:

 

What do you like about the text?

What do you dislike about it?

Is there anything that puzzled you?

Do you notice any patterns or connections?

 

You can use these questions about anything, even pictures! Use them to develop your comprehension skills. 

Have a look through the comprehension activity. There is a story to read, it is long so you can spread it over the week. Then there are different questions to answer.

 

Please continue to practice your phonics sounds daily (resources in extra activities).

 

Please also continue to read daily with your adults, reading your school books or challenging yourself with different ones. 

Simpler reading:

 

Once upon a time there lived a young boy called Tom. Tom had black hair and brown eyes. Tom was big and tall. Tom had a best friend called Dan. Tom and Dan went running in the park. The end.

 

 

Questions:

What colour hair did Tom have?

Was Tom small or big?

Who was Tom's best friend?

What did they enjoy doing in the park?

Activity 2- Can you read this story in a funny, loud, quiet, deep or high pitched voice?

Simpler reading:

The black cat and  white dog were friends. They played in the park and ran fast around the big green trees.  The cat was happy and the dog was happy too. They were best friends.

The end.

Book talk:

She turned in the saddle and looked behind her. Emma could see the others gaining on her. Digging in her heels, she whispered some words of encouragement in the ostrich’s ears as it burst into full speed. They were making good time, but there was so far still to go…

 

Can you continue the story? Who is chasing Emma? Is this a race or is she on another adventure?

Book Talk

 

In school, we do book talk. We read part of a book or poem and discuss four questions:

 

What do you like about the text?

What do you dislike about it?

Is there anything that puzzled you?

Do you notice any patterns or connections?

 

Further questions:

 

What do you think it would feel like to ride an ostrich?

How do you think the ostrich feels about being ridden?

What top-tips would you give Emma to help her win the race?

How do you think riding an ostrich would be different from riding a horse?

What thoughts do you thing are going through Emma’s mind?

Please continue to practice your phonics sounds daily (resources in extra activities).

 

Please also continue to read daily with your adults, reading your school books or challenging yourself with different ones. 

Can you read this story and answer the questions?

Book Talk

 

In school, we do book talk. We read part of a book or poem and discuss four questions:

 

Timidly, she pushed back the branches and peered into the clearing. Sunshine drenched the ground as it poured through the canopy above.

She had been following the trail of clues for days, and she had finally reached her destination. Were the stories true? Was this really the place people in her village had talked about for centuries?

She hoped her own story would have a fairy tale ending, but in the back of her mind a sickening thought arose – what if something more sinister waited ahead?

 

 

What do you like about the text?

What do you dislike about it?

Is there anything that puzzled you?

Do you notice any patterns or connections?

 

 

Question time!

Who is the girl in the picture?

Where has she come from?

What stories have been told in her village for centuries?

What do you think she hopes will be inside the house?

What will she actually find inside?

Why is she all alone?

What are the golden specks of light that appear at the front of the picture?

How has the girl found this place?

Book Talk

 

In school, we do book talk. We read part of a book or poem and discuss four questions:

 

The Patronus Charm is difficult to produce, and many witches and wizards struggle to produce a full Patronus: a guardian which generally takes the form of the animal with whom they share the deepest affinity. For Severus Snape however, a wizard trained and experienced in the Dark Arts, it was easy.

He felt a slight tingle from the end of his wand as he swished it in a smooth, subtle arc. A jet of flawless, pale-white light danced from its tip, and the Patronus began to take form in front of him…

 

 

What do you like about the text?

What do you dislike about it?

Is there anything that puzzled you?

Do you notice any patterns or connections?

 

 

Question time!

What form does Severus Snape’s Patronus take?

Why do you think the Patronus charm is a particularly difficult spell to cast?

Why has Snape performed the charm?

Where do you think Professor Snape is?

What might be about to happen?

Is anyone else in the Forbidden Forest with him?

Do you know of any other creatures that dwell there?

Do you know what form Harry Potter’s Patronus takes?

Book Talk

 

In school, we do book talk. We read part of a book or poem and discuss four questions:

 

It came from the sea, calmly at first. An enormous, slithering tentacle slowly oozing its way over the top of the sea wall, exploring the metal and concrete shapes with suckers the size of your front door.

Then, as more and more people came, and shrieks and cries of alarm filled the air, the creature became angry. All hell broke loose…

In an almighty tangle of limbs and water and buildings and people, the beast came violently exploding out of the frothing water. The normally sturdy metal supports of the buildings groaned under the extreme weight of the gigantic tentacles crushing them. Panic. Complete panic set in.

But where had the creature come from? What did it want? How could anybody stop it?

There wasn’t time for people to think. Only to run…

 

 

What do you like about the text?

What do you dislike about it?

Is there anything that puzzled you?

Do you notice any patterns or connections?

 

 

 

Question time!

Where do you think the creature has come from?

What do you think it usually eats?

Why do you think it has come up to the surface?

What do you think its feelings are towards humans?

Is it possible that there are sea creatures as big as this one lurking in our waters?

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