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Science

Check out some different ideas below:

  • STEM Project Follow these instructions to make your very own marble run!

 

10 Easy Science Experiments - That Will Amaze Kids

 

https://youtu.be/4MHn9Q5NtdY

Peekaboo Kidz

This YouTube channel has a range of fantastic, engaging videos that cover a range of geography and science topics. There are videos on Corona Virus, pollution, the water cycle and natural disasters. It may be worth keeping in mind that these videos are American so some spellings and pronunciation may be different to British English.

 

Rocket Mice

Have a go at making your own rocket mice! Follow the link for instructions and the science behind it.

 

3D Science Objects

Follow this link to explore a range of objects in 3 dimensions!

Explore the questions below:

Explore the questions below: 1
Explore the questions below: 2
Explore the questions below: 3

SCIENCE

 

Welcome to your science lesson! Look at the images below but STOP scrolling. You don't want to reveal what the image is too quickly. Have a think and consider what you can know about the living organism or object before scrolling down to find out the answer.

 

What am I?

 

Background science

Bumblebees have round bodies covered in soft hair, not tiny feathers, called pile. This makes them look and feel fuzzy. Their yellow, orange and black warning colours make them very noticeable and can often protect them from predators.

Many people think that the two large, black oval shapes at the sides of the bumblebee’s head are its eyes. These are its compound eyes, made up of lots of small repeating eye parts called ommatidia. These help the bee to see ultraviolet patterns on the petals of flowers and guide them towards nectar. A bumblebee also has three simple eyes, or ocelli, which look like small black bumps arranged in a triangular pattern on the top of its head.

 

Classification Keys

You will need sweets for today's lesson. I recommend buying some Liquorice All Sorts, Haribos and chocolates for the activity. Alternatively, you could use something else but there need to be clear similarities and differences between whatever objects you choose.

 

Look at your sweets.  As the variety of sweets in the world expands, a classification system is required. The British Confectioner’s Association (BCA) would like a classification system, much like Linnaeus’s classification system for nature, to try and organise its records.  You will need to use clear questions to sort your sweets according to very specific characteristics. 

Once you have completed your sweet classification system, you will now create some classification keys to help identify butterflies, birds or bumblebees found in the UK. It is not easy to catch any of these to identify them, so below are  some photographs/pictures instead. You will be classifying the individual species and will need to look very carefully at the characteristics of your set of living things to create the key.

 

If possible, you should choose one of the documents below, print them, cut them and sort them into a classification key. If you don't have a printer, you could create your classification key and write the animal name, or draw an image of it with a label in the correct place in your key.

 

You might look for a range of features, e.g. legs and beaks in birds, colours and patterns in butterflies, number of stripes and colour of ‘tails’ in bumblebees.

Note that the butterflies shown are males. Sometimes, the female has a similar appearance, but in other species they look quite different! This is another complication of classification, in that the female of a species can look quite different from the male of a species. 

Once you have completed your sweet classification system, you will now create some classification keys to help identify butterflies, birds or bumblebees found in the UK. It is not easy to catch any of these to identify them, so below are  some photographs/pictures instead. You will be classifying the individual species and will need to look very carefully at the characteristics of your set of living things to create the key.

 

If possible, you should choose one of the documents below, print them, cut them and sort them into a classification key. If you don't have a printer, you could create your classification key and write the animal name, or draw an image of it with a label in the correct place in your key.

 

You might look for a range of features, e.g. legs and beaks in birds, colours and patterns in butterflies, number of stripes and colour of ‘tails’ in bumblebees.

Note that the butterflies shown are males. Sometimes, the female has a similar appearance, but in other species they look quite different! This is another complication of classification, in that the female of a species can look quite different from the male of a species. 

Picture 1
Picture 2

 

In science, we had started learning about living things and their habitats. We had discussed the different ways we could group living organisms. This week, you are going to learn all about Carl Linnaeus, the father of classification, and study his classic system which is still used today.

 

Science Objectives
i) Describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including microorganisms, plants and animals.

ii) Give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.

Working Scientifically Objectives

  1. Plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions.
  2. Record results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, and classification keys.
  3. Report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations.
  4. Identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

 

A film about Carl Linnaeus | Natural History Museum

Watch this video to learn about Carl Linnaeus. He had 5 levels in his classification system: kingdom, class, order, genus and species. Animals from the same species can have offspring that can themselves have offspring, so dogs from separate breeds can still mate and have offspring because they are the same species

https://youtu.be/Gb_IO-SzLgk

We sort living things into 5 kingdoms.

Animalia includes all animals on Earth.

Plantae includes green, brown and red algae, liverworts, mosses, ferns and seed plants with or without flowers.

Monera consists of living things that have only one very simple cell, e.g. bacteria like E. coli which have no nucleus

Protista (e.g. Euglena, Amoeba & Paramecium) are also (mostly) unicellular, but they are more complex and have a nucleus.

Fungi include mushrooms and yeasts. 

  • Sub-groups Have a look at the red squirrel on this link. See how other animals in each sub-grouping have more and more things in common, until at genus level you are left with just a grey squirrel and a red squirrel.

Classification of Living Things

Watch as a lion is classified into groups to find its scientific name.

https://youtu.be/vqxomJIBGcY

 

Linnaeus’s binomial (2 names) naming system is a system for clear, simple scientific names. The genus and species use Latin and the genus name always starts with a capital letter and the species name with a lower case letter. Things in the same genus always have the same first name and a unique species name.  Scientists all over the world use the Latin names, so everyone is sure which species they are referring to – it doesn’t matter what the living thing is called in their own language (common name), e.g. a woodlouse is also known as a pill bug but its scientific name is Armadillium vulgare. It is interesting to note that if an L. appears after a scientific name it means that Linnaeus named it and if a dagger sign appears after a name it shows that the living thing is extinct! There is just one plant named after Linnaeus himself – his favourite Linnaea borealis, common name: twinflower.

Living Things Images

If you can, print the document above and cut out the images. If that isn't possible, you can draw or write the organisms on a piece of paper or in your workbook. You should sort the living organisms into the five kingdoms.  You can choose how to present this work, but you could create a table with each kingdom as a heading.

Now, your challenge is to find out who (out of the living organisms) is the most closely related and who is the least related in each set. Remember to find out the latin names for each organism too!

 

Look at the organisms in the Animalia kingdom. Predict which of these you think are the most closely and least closely related. Research using the internet to find out the answer.

 

Look at the organisms in the Plantae kingdom. Predict which of these you think are the most closely and least closely related. Research using the internet to find out the answer.

 

Look at the organisms in the Monera, Protista and Fungi kingdoms. Predict which of these you think are the most closely and least closely related. Research using the internet to find out the answer.

 

Which of these is the odd one out?

Picture 1

Which animal is the odd one out?

Only read the below information once you have decided which animal is the odd one out. There is no right or wrong answer, but here is some further detail about the animals in the picture.

 

These images show honey bees, a water buffalo with cattle egrets, and a guide dog for the blind.

 

Honey bees are found on every continent except Antarctica. It's estimated that about one third of the food we need is dependent upon pollination by bees. Most of the bees in a colony are worker bees (all female) that are responsible for everything: feeding the larvae,  tending to the queen, cleaning the hive, collecting nectar, guarding the colony, and building honeycomb. 

 

Water buffalo and cattle egrets are found in Asia and the sub-Indian continent. The relationship between the water buffalo and cattle egrets is a special type of relationship called symbiosis, where both parties benefit mutually from each other.  The egrets sit on the buffalo's back and eat insects and parasites that bite and irritate the buffalo.

 

Dogs can be trained to help us with many tasks, from supporting people with vision or hearing loss, to search and rescue. 

 

Science Ideas

Make an Egg Float in Salt Water

An egg sinks to the bottom if you drop it into a glass of ordinary drinking water but what happens if you add salt? The results are very interesting and can teach you some fun facts about density.

 

What you'll need:

  • One egg
  • Water
  • Salt
  • A tall drinking glass

 

Instructions:

  1. Pour water into the glass until it is about half full.
  2. Stir in lots of salt (about 6 tablespoons).
  3. Carefully pour in plain water until the glass is nearly full (be careful to not disturb or mix the salty water with the plain water).
  4. Gently lower the egg into the water and watch what happens.

 

What's happening?

Salt water is denser than ordinary tap water, the denser the liquid the easier it is for an object to float in it. When you lower the egg into the liquid it drops through the normal tap water until it reaches the salty water, at this point the water is dense enough for the egg to float. If you were careful when you added the tap water to the salt water, they will not have mixed, enabling the egg to amazingly float in the middle of the glass.

 

Design and Test a Parachute

Learn about air resistance while making an awesome parachute! Design one that can fall slowly to the ground before putting it to the test, making modifications as you go.

What you'll need:

 

  • A plastic bag or light material
  • Scissors
  • String
  • A small object to act as the weight, a little action figure would be perfect

 

Instructions:

  1. Cut out a large square from your plastic bag or material.
  2. Trim the edges so it looks like an octagon (an eight sided shape).
  3. Cut a small whole near the edge of each side.
  4. Attach 8 pieces of string of the same length to each of the holes.
  5. Tie the pieces of string to the object you are using as a weight.
  6. Use a chair or find a high spot to drop your parachute and test how well it worked, remember that you want it to drop as slow as possible.

 

What's happening?

Hopefully your parachute will descend slowly to the ground, giving your weight a comfortable landing. When you release the parachute the weight pulls down on the strings and opens up a large surface area of material that uses air resistance to slow it down. The larger the surface area the more air resistance and the slower the parachute will drop.

Cutting a small hole in the middle of the parachute will allow air to slowly pass through it rather than spilling out over one side, this should help the parachute fall straighter.

French

 

If you would like to do some French at home please use the bitesize link below. Do not forget you can also visit Language Angels, which we use in school. Go to www.languageangels.com enter the username: 6nw and password: Clapgate 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/z39d7ty 

 

French Lesson Food Vocabulary

https://youtu.be/gcMppC2W-gg

 

French weather phrases

Learn various weather phrases in French.

https://youtu.be/G8iBwQUvY-E

 

Quel temps fait il?

This song will help you whilst learning about the weather.

https://youtu.be/eBvJVOuBPXI

 

Links to other activities: 

 

French There are some great videos here to help with your French learning.

French Bitesize has a range of games, videos and quizzes to do to keep your French going!

Music Have a sing along with one of these great tunes!

French Games Make sure you select 'Primary Topics' / 'World Weather' / Games. There are lots of games to test your knowledge. If you get stuck, you can also work your way through the interactive lesson on this website.

Music

Music makes us feel good - especially when you sing! Have a sing-a-long to some of the songs below. Make sure you tune in to our Facebook page to see plenty of videos with Mr Robins singing songs too.

 

The Greatest Showman Cast - This Is Me (Official Lyric Video)

The official lyric video of "This Is Me" by The Greatest Showman Cast from the 'The Greatest Showman Soundtrack'. 'The Greatest Showman Soundtrack' available...

https://youtu.be/CjxugyZCfuw

 

Evolution of Music - Pentatonix

Watch this video to hear how music has developed and changed over the years! Can you recognise any of the music?

https://youtu.be/lExW80sXsHs

 

Music lesson- singing 

Music lesson Learn how to control pitch and volume when singing.

 

 

PSHE and RE

 

Identity, Society and Equality: Human Rights

 

What is a human right? What do you think should be rights that all humans should have? Note your ideas down on a spider diagram.

 

Read the document below. Who is 'we'? What is being discussed in this document?

 

A World Fit For Us

In some places around the world, due to a range of circumstances, children do not get all their needs met. For example, a child growing up in a place where there is war may not have all their needs met. 

Case Studies

There are many organisations that do lots of work to support childrenʼs rights around the world such as, Unicef or Save the Children. Research these different charities. What do they do? What are their aims? How do they achieve these?

Unicef

Save the Children

What do you think governments, including the British government, should or could do?

 

Write a letter to an MP about the issues you have studied. Make sure to include a range of year 6 writing features, such as formal language, persuasive techniques and a range of punctuation.

Identity, Society and Democracy: Human Rights

 

What is a home? 

 

Make a list of everything that makes where you live your home. See if you can time yourself for one minute and try and make a list of at least 20 items that make you feel at home.

 

Now, create a zone of relevance diagram. Draw 3 circles next to each other. Label the middle one with essential items', the circle on the left with 'important items' and the one on the right with 'not important items'. Try and place each of the items you thought of into the right circle. Were there any you found difficult? Why?

 

 

Homeless What would it be like not to have a home? Have a look at this website to find out more. There is a video here to watch about a girl called Natasha who was homeless.

 

Consider some of the difficulties of homelessness, for example health, education, social (friends / family), work / career / aspirations.

 

Record your ideas on pieces on a spider diagram.

 

Underneath your spider diagram, write a paragraph or a couple of sentences answering the question below.

 

What does home mean to you?

Mental Wellbeing

 

How do you feel?

 

What are your worries and concerns?

 

Watch the video below. It might be a good idea to watch this with an adult to help answer any questions this brings up. What did you learn about mental health?

We All Have Mental Health

Now that you've watched the video and worked through the PowerPoint presentation, can you make a list of your feelings?

 

Put those feelings that are everyday (they come and go) in one column, and those that are overwhelming in another column. You could even do a Venn diagram as shown in the presentation.

 

Everyday Feelings                                           Overwhelming Feelings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Talk about how you're feeling with a trusted adult. If you're not sure who to talk to, try making a list of all the adults in your life you trust. You can also include friends and siblings, but make sure if the feelings are overwhelming, you talk to an adult.

 

 

Follow the link below and explore some of the different religions from around the world. 

ICT

Text Adventures

 

This half term, the plan was to learn about text adventures on Purple Mash.

 

What is a text adventure?

Hopefully, you've remembered that a text adventure is a computer game that uses text instead of graphics.

 

Text adventures were very popular before graphics-based games were invented. Despite the lack of graphics, they are still fun to play and often require you to think and solve puzzles. Modern games such as ‘escape the room’ adventures are much like text adventures, but with the addition of visual clues.

 

Have you played computer games that follow a story?

Most computer games have a story, and many take you on an adventure determined by the choices that you make. The game is designed in a way that reacts to the choices that you make and gives you a selection of options to choose from.

 

Many adventure games today are based upon books or films.

 

The theme can be quite simple. For example, a scenario of walking to the shops to run an errand and being presented with choices such as do you continue to the shops or play in the park? The main idea in a story adventure is a narrative where you are presented with choices that have different consequences.

 

Before making a story adventure, you need to plan it. In Purple Mash, you can use a tool called 2Connect to do this. 

 

 

Little Red Riding Hood Example

Little Red Riding Hood Example 1

The colours each represent something: choices are coloured red, and the story endings are purple. The yellow node shows a decision that will take you to a different storyline. Before starting your plan, children should decide upon a theme for their story; perhaps a famous historical figure or your favourite character from a story? Your stories should contain just a few choices to begin with. The more choices, the more complex the code. Start with a simple story to get the idea of how to do it.

 

  1. Open a blank 2Connect file
  2. In 2Connect, you can click and type anywhere in the document. If you click on the page and a node appears that you don’t want, it will disappear if you don’t write in it. The boxes of writing are called nodes. 
  3. Click somewhere near the top of the document and write the title.
  4. When you click on a node a pencil will appear, as will arrows in the top corner. The arrows allow you to make the node bigger and smaller.
  5. To add a background colour to a node, click on the pencil and then choose the colour.
  6. Alter the text size so that all the nodes can fit on the screen.
  7. You can easily add pictures, weblinks and sound to each of the nodes from this screen, though this is not strictly necessary for a text-based adventure.
  8. Once you have added a title, add the next steps in the story.
  9. To add a link, hover the mouse over the edge of the selected node where the border is pale blue. The arrow will turn to a hand. Click and drag the line to the node you wish to link. To remove a link, click on the small purple box, drag it away from the box and drop it on the blank page somewhere.
  10. To change the direction of the link or colour of the line, click on the arrow on the line.
  11. You will need to rearrange the boxes as you go to make the diagram look clear. Nodes can be dragged around and the links will remain attached.
  12. Notes allow the user to add some information to the node; this can be useful as only a few characters of text can be inserted in a node. These appear when the node is clicked on. Click on the pencil and then on the button. 

Text Adventures Knowledge Organiser

PE

Kids HIIT workout, will build endurance, timing, coordination, and strength. 

https://youtu.be/lc1Ag9m7XQo

P.E. idea! KIDZ BOP Kids - Dance Monkey (Dance Along)

We know you love this song! Why not learn a dance routine to go with it! What better way to do PE then dance!

Workout with Maurice

15 min workout to get in shape.

https://youtu.be/L_A_HjHZxfI

 

 

Frozen | A Cosmic Kids Yoga Adventure!

Cosmic Kids Yoga has loads of brilliant yoga videos on Youtube. This is only one of many, so have a go at this one, or have a search for one on a topic you're interested on. There are yoga videos based on Harry Potter, Trolls and Alice in Wonderland, but these are just a few so make sure you have a look to find one that's right for you.

 

Frozen | A Cosmic Kids Yoga Adventure!

Mindfulness Meditation for Kids | BREATHING EXERCISE | Guided Meditation for Children

 

Mindfulness Meditation for Kids | BREATHING EXERCISE | Guided Meditation for Children

History

One of our topics for this year is the Vikings so why not take a look at the links below and do some of your own learning about the Vikings! 

 

  • The Vikings
  • History This link will take you to a selection of videos and images to give an overview into multiple areas of the history curriculum, including World War II, Britain, the Victorians, lost lands and the Vikings. Have a look at whatever interests you on this page!
  • Anglo-Saxon History Earlier this academic year, we learnt all about the Anglo-Saxons. Refresh your memory with these clips and articles. At the bottom of the page there is also a link to some games which you could have a go at.

Life in Anglo Saxon Britain | The Story of Britain | BBC Teach

Suitable for teaching 7-11s. Life in Anglo-Saxon Britain is shown through the eyes of a family, including an exploration of different approaches to medicine ...

https://youtu.be/-cKGz-st75w

 

Video clip recapping learning about Anglo Saxon's. Could make an information poster. 

Geography

 

Geography Follow this link to learn about a range of geographical skills such as writing and reading maps, lines of latitude and longitude and how contours, keys and symbols work. There also sections on people and places, the natural world, human geography and sustainability. Within the natural world section there are lessons on volcanoes and earthquakes which will tie in well with what was being taught before school closures due to Covid 19.

 

Ordnance Survey Resources This link takes you to the ordnance survey website where there are multiple resources you can download for free, including instructions on map reading, map symbol flashcards and outline maps to test children's knowledge. This is a great website if you want to focus on map reading skills.

 

Earthquake Proof Buildings

Last half term, you learnt about a range of structures that are used to enable buildings to be earthquake proof or earthquake resistant.

 

Using your knowledge on these structures, can you design, make and evaluate your own mini earthquake resistant building?

 

  1. Design your building by drawing a diagram. Consider the structures and materials you will use and make sure you label them.
  2. Create your building. Take care here and don't rush. 
  3. Evaluate your building. Is it fit for purpose? Place your building on a surface which you can shake (such as a chair seat or table). Does it remain standing or does it collapse?
  4. If your building collapsed, can you make changes to improve it? If your building worked, can you write a set of instructions for someone younger on how to build an earthquake resistant building?

 

Iceland and Volcanoes

You might be surprised to learn that volcanoes are not only in hot countries. Iceland is one country which is home to multiple volcanoes. Why do you think that is?

Can you remember why it's possible for there to be such hot lava coming out of a volcano, even in a cold country?

 

Using the internet, you should research Iceland and its volcanoes. Once you have done this, you should make a holiday brochure or leaflet to advertise Iceland and its volcanoes. Make sure to include persuasive features, lots of fascinating facts and plenty of images.

 

Below are some links to further information to help you get started.

  • Google Maps Have a look around Iceland. Can you find any volcanoes?

 

Iceland's Volcanic World | National Geographic

Discover Iceland's boiling rivers, geysers, and volcanoes with explorer Andres Ruzo. Sponsored by Coors Light. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/mynext/ ➡ S...

ART

Volcano Art

Have a go at doing some volcano art. This week, we'll focus on sketching and drawing. Watch the video below for step by step instructions to create your own wonderful volcano art!

How to Draw a Volcano

All you need for this is paper and a pencil. Alternatively, you could try using a pen, as Ripon does in this video. Happy drawing!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7CHGUrKc8s&feature=youtu.be

Drawing With Your Eraser

Learn how to draw with a rubber/eraser!

https://youtu.be/YBji8B0hmAQ

Banksy Style Stencilling

 

Why not create a Banksy-style stencilled image with just a paper plate, scissors, paint and a brush?

 

1. Choose an image and draw this on a paper plate.

2. Cut it out to leave an empty silhouette.

3. Next, place the plate in position on a chosen background 

4. Apply paint to the stencil either by spraying of stippling with a thick brush. The background can be pre-prepared on card or paper.

5. Once the stencil is lifted from the background, the stippled image is revealed.

 

Alternatively, the stencil could be applied directly to a wall or board in the same way. The image can be repeated many times over and flipped to create a reverse image. 


 

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